How to determine your machine is “Little Endian” or “Big Endian”.

What is big and Little Endian ?

Little and big endian are two ways of storing multibyte data-types ( int, float, etc). In little endian machines, last byte of binary representation of the multibyte data-type is stored first. On the other hand, in big endian machines, first byte of binary representation of the multibyte data-type is stored first.

Big Endian(Wikipedia)

Little Endian(Wikipedia)

Is there a quick way to determine endianness of your machine?
There are n no. of ways for determining endianness of your machine. Here is one quick way of doing the same.

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   unsigned int i = 1;
   char *c = (char*)&i;
   if (*c)   
       printf("Little endian");
   else
       printf("Big endian");
   getchar();
   return 0;
}

In the above program, a character pointer c is pointing to an integer i. Since size of character is 1 byte when the character pointer is de-referenced it will contain only first byte of integer. If machine is little endian then *c will be 1 (because last byte is stored first) and if machine is big endian then *c will be 0.

Seconds Since the “Epoch”

I was supposed to write a RT (Real Time) logging which doesn’t call a single Linux CALL.
I had only seconds from 1st Jan 1970 (Called Eposh).

A value that approximates the number of seconds that have elapsed since the Epoch. A Coordinated Universal Time name (specified in terms of seconds (tm_sec), minutes (tm_min), hours (tm_hour), days since January 1 of the year (tm_yday), and calendar year minus 1900 (tm_year)) is related to a time represented as seconds since the Epoch, according to the expression below.

If the year is <1970 or the value is negative, the relationship is undefined. If the year is>=1970 and the value is non-negative, the value is related to a Coordinated Universal Time name according to the C-language expression, where tm_sec,  tm_min,  tm_hour,  tm_yday,  and  tm_year are all integer types:

tm_sec + tm_min*60 + tm_hour*3600 + tm_yday*86400 +
    (tm_year-70)*31536000 + ((tm_year-69)/4)*86400 -
    ((tm_year-1)/100)*86400 + ((tm_year+299)/400)*86400

The relationship between the actual time of day and the current value for seconds since the Epoch is unspecified.

How any changes to the value of seconds since the Epoch are made to align to a desired relationship with the current actual time is implementation-defined. As represented in seconds since the Epoch, each and every day shall be accounted for by exactly 86400 seconds.

Note:
The last three terms of the expression add in a day for each year that follows a leap year starting with the first leap year since the Epoch. The first term adds a day every 4 years starting in 1973, the second subtracts a day back out every 100 years starting in 2001, and the third adds a day back in every 400 years starting in 2001. The divisions in the formula are integer divisions; that is, the remainder is discarded leaving only the integer quotient.

You can convert epoch Seconds to current time please look at this LINK.